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Posts Tagged ‘Virtual Machine’

Installing Windows Server 2012 on a Hyper-V virtual machine

March 29, 2013 1 comment

Installing Windows Server 2012 is a pretty straight-forward exercise akin to installing any of the latest Windows client operating systems. In this post the focus is on installing the OS on a Hyper-V virtual machine which once the disk is correctly mounted, is exactly the same as installing on a physical machine.

If you do not have a Hyper-V virtual machine yet and would learn how to create one, refer here. If you already have a virtual machine with a blank virtual hard drive ready for installation, the following would be the step by step method.

Within Hyper-V manager, selected the virtual machine target from the list and clicked on "Connect".

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And once the VM window popped up as below, verified that the ISO file containing the OS I am about to install is still mounted as a virtual disk on the VM

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Since this is good, clicked on the "Start" button to launch it.

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If the ISO is a good bootable OS disk the following screen should appear indicating launch of the Windows Server 2012 installer. It is now about making the right selections and getting the OS installed. Clicked "Next".

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Clicked "Install Now"

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Entered the product key and clicked "Next".

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And since I am not cool enough yet to work just with the Core, selected "Server with a GUI" option and hit "Next".

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Next screen, License Terms – read (skimmed really), accepted, clicked "Next".

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Next, you get to select the kind of installation you want to proceed with. You have two options one of which – "Upgrade" is not valid because it is only applicable when there is an existing version of Windows running on the machine on which you’re currently running the installer. Since we started with a blank VM, there is nothing to overwrite. Therefore, the obvious choice to make here is "Custom". Clicked on the "Custom" button to move on ahead.

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Due to the simplicity of what this machine will need to do, I have desisted from my favorite pastime of making drive partitions during OS installation and chosen the virtual hard drive in its entirety to serve as the OS partition. Clicked "Next".

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And off we go. The installation procedure could take a while. In my case it took 7 minutes.

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When done, you get to provide the Administrator password for the machine. Now this is something I have done in the past and forgotten to set the domain policy later on to not expire. It gets painful when the password expires and you need to change it. This time hopefully, I will remember to configure and document the steps to set the administrator password not to expire. Typed in a safe password here and hit "Finish".

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Done.

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Logged in for the first time and here’s what we have

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Creating a new Hyper-V Virtual Machine

This post covers the creation of a new virtual machine on Hyper-V where the host environment has the following resources and settings:

  • Operating System – Windows 8
  • Memory – 32 GB
  • Processor – Intel Core i5 – Quad core
  • Disk Space – Over 700 GB available

This is not to say that a host machine with a different or lesser configuration is not suitable. It is just important to note that the resources allocated to the virtual machine and the guest operating system are dependent on what the host can support with enough left over for the host to run its own programs, processes and services.

Started with the Hyper-V Manager and chose to create a new virtual machine.

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You see the "Before you begin" screen to start with. Skipped ahead by clicking on "Next >"

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On the next screen, gave a name to the VM and selected a location to save it to. Clicked on "Next >" to move on

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On the next screen, allocated 512 MB memory to the machine. This should really depend on what the machine is intended to be used for and what memory capacity it requires to have based on the workloads it is expected to handle. Clicked on "Next >" to continue with VM creation.

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On the next screen, made the choice of the network switch that the VM will use for communication. Refer to the post here to learn how to set up a virtual network switch on Hyper-V. The choice made as shown in the screen here is an "Internal" virtual switch that allows communications between all VMs connected to this switch and also with the host OS. Clicked on "Next >".

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The following screen is where you define the properties of the virtual hard drive that will constitute the virtual machine. Firstly, I chose to create a new virtual hard drive because I didn’t already have one. You can also use an existing .vhdx file if you have one installed. Secondly, I made the choice of allocating the suggested 127 GB. This can be hiked up or down based on how much storage is required on the machine based on its purpose. Important to note here is that allocating 127 GB doesn’t mean that a space that large is blocked off on the disk. The disk increases gradually as data is added to it. Clicked on "Next >".

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On the following screen, you get to make a choice of when and what operating system is to be installed on the new virtual hard drive being set up. I chose to install Windows Server 2012 from an ISO image that I had available and clicked "Next >"

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The next screen shows a summary of choices made. Clicked "Finish" and done.

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This only covers the creation of a new virtual machine and assigning it a virtual hard drive. If it is a newly created virtual hard drive, bear in mind that it will have nothing on it yet and therefore will need to go through an OS installation before it becomes useful.

Categories: Hyper-V Tags: ,

Setting up a virtual switch for a Hyper-V network

March 29, 2013 13 comments

This post speaks to how to set up a virtual switch to be used as the network over which several virtual machines can communicate. We start by launching the Hyper-V Manager application and choosing the "Virtual Switch Manager" from the "Actions" menu on the right

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There are three types of virtual switches available – External, Internal and Private.

  • External allows you to connect your VMs to each other and to the physical host machine. It requires a physical adapter on the host machine that will be used to communicate with the physical network that the host is connected to.
  • Internal allows communications between the VMs and the host operating system. It does not require a physical adapter on the host machine and will not allow communication with any actual physical network.
  • Private only allows communications between the virtual machines. It does not allow any communication of the VMs with the host operating system.

Setting up an Internal connection type

Since I may require some transfer of information between the host and the guest operating systems, I decided to use the "Internal" virtual switch type. From past implementations, I have seen that you can change the nature of the virtual switch later but will need to restart the Virtual Machines to reflect changes.

Especially if you are switching to or from the "External" type, it will affect the connection on the host because Hyper-V switches out the physical adapter on the host so that the host operating system may start using a virtual adapter as well. This is because the way the networking works is that the host operating system is no longer allow to use the physical adapter on the host machine once an "External" switch has been configured. A new virtual adapter is installed on the host that becomes the outlet of communication for the host OS. The VMs and the host OS all communicate with the virtual switch through their individual virtual adapter which then routes communication to the other machines for internal conversations and out through the physical adapter on the host machine for external communications.

Made the selection and clicked on "Create Virtual Switch"

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Gave the switch a name and chose not to use a VLAN identifier for the host operating system. Clicked on "OK"

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And that’s all there is to it for an Internal switch type. At this point, a virtual machine configured to use this connection should be able to communicate with other virtual machines configured to use it and the host operating system given the static IP address allocated to the virtual adapter on the VM is in the same subnet as the host.

To understand how to set this up so that files can be interchanged between the guest and the host, refer to this post on the topic.

Now if you wanted to have your virtual machine have the ability to communicate over the physical network on the host, meaning the ability to access the Internet and so on (assuming your host machine can), an "External" switch will be required.

Setting up an External connection type

An important thing to note about the "External" switch is that it affects the network set up on the host machine as well. Once an "External" switch is set up, the host operating system is no longer able to communicate directly with the physical adapter. Instead, all machines, physical and virtual will use a virtual adapter to communicate with the virtual switch which then routes traffic among machines or in and out through the physical adapter.

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Setting up an External Connection Type

So to be able to compare the before and after scenario, here’s the state of the network adapters on my host before I used the "External" switch type. This picture represents the set up at the end of the "Internal" switch type configuration above.

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The vEthernet adapter is the Virtual Switch that the "VirtualNet" network I set up above uses. Doing an ipconfig yields the following showing that the vEthernet adapter is unconnected and the host OS is currently connected through the WiFi adapter to the physical network.

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Now to change the VirtualNet network type to "External", I went back to the Hyper-V Manager, launched the Virtual Switch Manager and selected the existing "Internal" network called "VirtualNet" that I created above. I changed the "Connection Type" to "External network" and selected the adapter from the drop down that is connected to the physical network. Then clicked on "Apply".

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The following warning is presented. This is expected because changes are being made to the network adapters on the host machine. Clicked on "Yes" to apply changes.

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And here is the after picture. The WiFi adapter now appears bridged through the Network Bridge added to the picture. The vEthernet adapter on the other hand is now connected to the physical network.

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ipconfig now shows the following output

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And the multiplexor network bridge properties show the following

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A virtual machine set up to use this connection now should be able to tunnel through to the physical connection on the host. One thing to ensure is that the virtual machine is able to accept a DHCP assigned IP. If it has a static IP, you may need to switch it to automatically acquire IP and DNS settings. That done, you should be able to browse the Internet through the virtual machine and DNS resolution would work just fine.

Just another SharePoint VM–Part 4–Installing SharePoint 2013 Preview

October 10, 2012 Leave a comment

To this point I have installed Windows Server 2012 and configured it (published in Part 1), setup the service accounts required by SQL Server and SharePoint (published in Part 2), installed SQL Server 2012 and configured it (published in Part 3) and now am ready to go ahead and install SharePoint 2013 Preview. What I have in terms of media is the .img file from Microsoft downloads which I will not be able to use in Oracle VM VirtualBox. So I went ahead and extracted the contents to a folder on my host machine that I shared with the virtual machine. Having done this, when I browse the contents of the folder, I see the following:

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Though setup.exe immediately caught my eye, I paused to check if there was a prerequisite installer like in SharePoint 2010. Sure enough, there it was. I decided to run this first to ensure everything SharePoint 2013 required was in place. The followings is the list of items, the prerequisite installer professes to install. As you can see, the IIS role is one of the items on the list. This is why we did not have to add the IIS role during Windows Server 2012 configuration. Moved on by clicking "Next".

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On the following screen is the EULA. Read and accepted the terms to move on:

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At this point, the prerequisite installation starts and could take a few minutes to go through and install all items listed above. For items that are already installed or for items where later versions are already available on the target environment, the prerequisite installer is clever enough to take no action.

The installation of the web server role requires a restart. I went ahead and clicked on "Finish" to restart the VM.

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Again, I have to mention here how fast the restart operation is for a server operating system compared to what I have been used to. Including update configurations resulting from pre-restart changes, it took just over a minute to get back to the login screen. Logged in again as the administrator and the prerequisite installer continued with the configuration of IIS role, installation of the Windows Server AppFabric, WIF and other items on the list.

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Here’s the report after completion of all installations – except for those that were skipped intentionally, everything else installed correctly.

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The installation report urges you to look at the following list of optional software prerequisites that you may want to install.

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In order to figure out what makes this list of items optional (or what I will not be able to do without them), I decided to ignore these for now and clicked on "Finish" to exit the prerequisite installer. Restarted the VM for good measure to flush out any residual updates or configuration before moving on.

When the system restarted, I did a couple of things

1. Took a snapshot of the VM to this point that I can restore to in case something went wrong with the installation.

2. Logged in as the SP Setup account we created before – this is the account we want to use to install SharePoint.

Having dallied enough, it was now time to go on to the installation of SharePoint 2013 itself. So launched my shared location with the bits extract again and launched setup.exe this time.

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After a short prep screen display, you are asked for the product key. Entered and selected "Continue".

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Again, read and accepted the license terms

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Next, we have the file location selection. There was no real reason to change any of these – so moved on by clicking on "Install Now".

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Next the installation progress screen goes through and tracks the installation of the product. This takes a few minutes – especially during the finalization of installation – the overall process took about 5 minutes for me.

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When done, this is what you see. Evidently, the easiest part of the installation so far was the actual installation of SharePoint products. Now for the tricky part – the configuration of SharePoint products. As you can see below, the installer checks the box that will launch the configuration wizard. If you want to go ahead and configure now, just click "Close". If not, you could uncheck the box and launch the Configuration Wizard later. I chose to run the wizard.

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The Configuration Wizard runs and tells you to have certain things on hand to complete configuration. The name of the database server and the username and password for the farm account which we already created in a previous step – known as SP Service.

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Next, the warning about the services that will need to be reset during configuration is shown. There is no way to escape this if I want to complete configuration so I select "Yes" to move on.

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On the next screen, I choose to create a new server farm

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On the following screen, specified the server name and the username and password of the farm account. The username should be entered in DOMAIN\username format – this is important. Did not change the database name here and clicked "Next" to proceed.

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On the next screen, chose and confirmed a passphrase that will be used by all servers in the farm to secure configuration data. The passphrase needs to be 8 characters long, have uppercase and lowercase characters, numerals and special characters to meet complexity criteria.

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Next, you get to specify the port on which the Central Administration application will be installed. I usually choose the year (version) of the product for this – makes it easy to remember. Also, the authentication provider can be selected here. I chose "NTLM".

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Next, the configuration wizard shows a quick summary of the selections and settings made so far before configuration is applied. When you click "Next" here is when all of the real SharePoint setup is happening and you need this part to work well – ergo, fingers crossed.

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Follow the progress very closely – it is important to know where and what fails here to be able to troubleshoot. Somewhat easier than reading logs later.

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Some tense moments (about 5 minutes) and several shortened nails later

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A little happy dance and then clicked on "Finish" to bring up the Central Administration application in a new browser window.

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In past versions, after installation, there were a set of tasks added somewhere for the administrator to "go do" – such as "Servers on the farm", "Services on the Server" and so forth, to complete the configuration of the farm. SharePoint 2013 provides you a wizard.

Now I would have preferred to configure the farm myself but I wanted to see what the wizard would do. So I clicked on "Start the Wizard". On the next screen you get to manage the service applications you want to run on the server and the account using which to run them. It is recommended that a different account than the farm account be used. I specified a the "SP Services" account already created for this.

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A slightly different message asking you to wait while changes are made. I like it for now (because it is shiny and new) although soon, I may not like it as much. It took quite a while here (over 12 minutes – likely due to the limited RAM allocation I could make… *sigh*)

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When done, here’s where we end up as the next step in the wizard. Creating a site collection. I am in the habit of creating a site collection at the root of the server. Therefore, I go ahead and do that while applying the "Publishing Portal" template to the site – Why? No particular reason – happens to be the set of features I want to explore first.

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Again, the already irksome "Sorry to keep you waiting" message for about 3 minutes and then

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Clicked "Finish" and done. We end up on the familiar Central Administration view.

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So how about that root site collection we created? Navigating to the root site brings up the following. Note – no fancy images, logos or web parts just a plain site with placeholders for content to come.

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And a list of things to do for an Information Architect and a Visual Designer. Kind of different than earlier versions. But more on that later. For now, we have successfully installed and verified the SharePoint Server 2013 Preview.

Just another SharePoint VM–Part 2–Setting up the service accounts

October 10, 2012 Leave a comment

If you have not already checked it out, the installation and configuration of Windows Server 2012 on a new VM has been published in Part 1. We shall now progress on to setting up required service accounts before going on to install other software components and prerequisites for SharePoint.

When you install SharePoint, it is recommended that you create service accounts as which each of the several services – not only those of SharePoint but also those of SQL Server – may run. For SharePoint 2013, the required service accounts are enumerated in this TechNet guidance.

In order to create these service accounts, we’ll use the Active Directory Users and Computers tile on the Start Menu shown below:

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When in the management console, expand the local domain, right click on the "Managed Service Accounts" branch and drill down the "New" option to create a new "User".

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The first one we’ll create is a service account to run the SQL Server service as:

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The following settings relating to the password policy are what I typically use to ensure that service account passwords do NOT expire and cause the services to stop unannounced.

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Follow this up with a few more accounts:

1. To use as the SharePoint setup user – the low privilege account that we shall install SharePoint as – we shall call this "SP Setup"

2. For the farm account – the one that SharePoint application pool is going to use – we shall call this "SP Service"

3. The account using which to run the service applications after installing SharePoint – we shall call this "SP Services"

When done, you should have the following:

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Next we need to add the SharePoint setup service account – known as SP Setup above to the local Administrators group on this server. To do this, right click on the user and choose "Properties". Go to the "Member Of" tab and click on the "Add…" button. In the "Select Groups" dialog, type "Administrators" into the object names to select box and click on "Check Names" to resolve it.

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Click on "OK" on the "Select Groups" dialog to see the group added to the list of those that the user is a member of. Click "OK" on the Properties dialog to complete. After we have completed installing SQL Server 2012 on the machine, we will need to add a login to SQL Server for this user and add them to a couple of roles – securityadmin, dbcreator and db_owner.

NOTE: The documentation says you only need the db_owner role if you run powershell cmdlets using this account that affect the database which I usually do require.

NOTE: We do not do any of this for the SharePoint Farm account – known above as SP Service – because during SharePoint Configuration, this account should automatically be given the required database privileges.

We can now progress on to installation of SQL Server 2012 and SharePoint 2013.

Read about installing and configuring SQL Server 2012 in readiness for SharePoint 2013 in Part 3.

Just another SharePoint VM–Part 3–Installing SQL Server 2012

October 10, 2012 Leave a comment

Now that we have a virtual machine with Windows Server 2012 installed and configured with the roles/services required (published in Part 1) and the service accounts required all set up (published in Part 2), we can go on to the next step – installation of SQL Server 2012. It is possible to install SharePoint 2013 with a built-in version of SQL but I wanted to attempt using an individual instance of SQL Server 2012.

We start by choosing to open the ISO file for SQL Server 2012 from the VirtualBox menu and when the virtual drive loads up, choose to run “setup.exe”.

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Screen clipping taken: 10/5/2012 10:08 AM

The SQL Server Installation Center launches with all the usual guidance around planning for deployment of SQL Server.

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I chose to move on to the next step – Installation by clicking on the link on the left and the following options are presented:

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Chose the first option “New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation”. Setup support rules are run and any items that may prevent complete or proper setup of SQL Server will be identified here. In my case, everything passed.

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Clicked on “OK” to move on to the next step. Here’s where you choose to install an evaluation copy or enter a key if you have one and move on.

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Read and accepted the license terms on the next screen and moved on.

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The following warning came up with searching for updates – this was because after I had made my DNS installation on the machine, I’d forgotten to go back and auto-detect DNS on the VM virtual network card. This is a problem that can be fixed later by ensuring the tunnel through to the host machine network works. So I moved on.

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Installation of setup files comes next

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The following warnings showed up

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The first that the computer is a domain controller. But we are doing that by intent – so that is fine to ignore. The second was caused by my non-existent internet connection again which should be remedied later – so I ignored it. The last relating to the Windows Firewall was expected as well since I disabled it. Moving on. The next screen is for the role you want to install. Went with “SQL Server Feature Installation” here.

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Next comes the feature selection page. Since I was installing a developer machine for some basic testing, I went with Database Engine Services, the Management Tools and the SQL Client Connectivity SDK. You can always add features to the existing instance later.

NOTE: If you would like to use Business Intelligence features on SharePoint with Analysis services in SQL Server, choosing Analysis Services here will help. If you would like to use reporting features, installing SQL Server Reporting Services will help. This will require installing the SQL Server Reporting Services add-in for SharePoint and will require some configuration post installation.

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Again, an installation rule check occurs and any failures are reported. Clicked “Next” to move on

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The instance configuration page is next. I chose to install the default instance:

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A small pause and the disk space requirement page is shown. Our allocation of space on the virtual machine disk should suffice for this requirement.

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On the Server Configuration page that shows up next, we set up the service accounts we want to use for the SQL Server Agent and the SQL Server Database Engine – the account known as SQL Service above. To do this, I dropped down the account name and “Browse…” for the user by typing their name into the object selection box and clicking on “Check Name”. Once the name was resolved, I clicked on “OK” to add them in. Back on the Setup page, you will need to type in the password you used when you were creating the account.

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This is what it should look like when done. Note that I keep the Startup Type on both as they are before I hit “Next” to move on.

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On the next screen we get to specify the authentication mode -which I always keep as Windows – and list administrators – where I always add the “Administrator” which is easily done by clicking on the “Add Current User” button

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I don’t change anything on the “Data Directories” tab usually – where SQL Server chooses to put its files is fine by me. I do head over to the FILESTREAM tab and make the following selections. These will help with configuration of Remote Blob Storage if required. You should be able to do this from SQL Configuration Manager later.

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Next Step, error reporting. I didn’t turn this on and moved on.

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Again a configuration rule check which passed in my case. Moved on to the next step

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An installation summary is shown for all things selected and configured so far

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Clicked “Install” and off we go… this could take a while so go get your coffee and donuts or whatever.

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Done. SQL Server is installed.

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The start menu looks fuller now

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Now for some configuration – launched the SQL Server Management Studio and connected to the local database engine

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Expanded the “Security” branch and selected “Logins”. Right click and select “New Login…” to add a new login for the SharePoint Setup account – known as SP Setup above.

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On the “Login – New” dialog, clicked on “Search…” to locate the user named SP Setup. In the lookup dialog, typed spsetup and hit “Check Names” to resolve the name, then hit “OK”. Back on the “Login – New” dialog, selected “Server Roles” in the left navigation and checked the roles “dbcreator” and “securityadmin”

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That’s it. Hit “OK” on the dialog to create the new login and assign the server roles specified.

After the installation of SharePoint 2013, during configuration, one of the things the Configuration Wizard attempts to do is to check the maximum degree of parallelism setting on SQL Server. This “maxdop” setting determines how many processors SQL Server can assume it can use to create its execution plans. For some reason, the standard installation of SQL Server 2012 sets this to ‘0’. We need this to be at least ‘1’.

Now if we were using the administrator account during SharePoint configuration, it probably wouldn’t be a problem because this account would have the permissions to change the setting on the fly. However, since we intend to use the Setup service account (and I haven’t been able to figure out what permissions this account will require to be able to change this setting), it would make sense to have this setting made before we get to that stage.

Therefore, there is one more thing to do while we are within the SQL Server Management Studio. Right click on the server name at the top and select properties.

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This brings up the properties dialog. Selected “Advanced” from the left navigation and found “Max Degree of Parallelism” under “Parallelism” and changed the value against it (was 0 to start with) to 1. Clicked on “OK” to apply.

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With that we come to the end of the installation of SQL Server 2012 and configuration in readiness for the installation of SharePoint 2013. The next step is to go ahead and install SharePoint 2013 itself.

Read about installation and configuration of SharePoint 2013 Preview in Part 4.

Just another SharePoint VM–Part 1–Installing Windows Server 2012

October 10, 2012 2 comments

Of a whim, I just wanted to start again to build a VM to learn something new. Being a SharePoint guy that hasn’t yet started playing with SharePoint 2013, that was my natural choice. But that wasn’t the only choice to make. Before, I started installing SharePoint 2013 Preview on a VM, I had to make a choice of what VM technology to use and what guest operating system to install on it. Since Windows VM is not an option with 64-bit guest operating systems, I tried my next best bet which I have used before – Oracle VM Virtual Box.

I then had to figure out if I wanted to do what was tried and tested – Windows Server 2008 R2 or go to Windows Server 2012 and see what I can figure out. I chose the latter – just so I can learn something new as opposed to just following instructions others had written down.

I shall not go into the details of how I set up the VM and so forth here – it is a pretty standard experience on VirtualBox. I will mention however that I started with 6 GB RAM. Not sufficient for even a simple single server installation of SharePoint 2013 by any means because the Microsoft recommendation is 24 GB. But with only 8 GB RAM on my host machine and several thousands of dollars short of buying my own blade server, it was the best I could do. Also, I used a dynamically expanding disk set to a maximum size of 100 GB.

The Windows Server 2012 installation experience doesn’t change at all from other versions of Windows – client or server. If anything, it is closer to the standard Windows Client operating system installation experience. Select a language, select an installation type (keep data or new install), select a disk, select an administrator password and done.

When you’re done installing and first login (through a metro style interface), the server manager launches with the below information.

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The above is what you see after you’ve just installed Windows Server 2012 and logged in – the new Server Manager view. The following is the list of features and roles that are already turned on:

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Next steps

1. Changed the time zone – I am not going into how to do this – everybody knows.

2. Turned off IE Enhance Security Configuration for Admins and Users – again, very simple to get to from the server manager view – just click on the link:

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3. The network that the host computer was connected to was auto-detected and configured to be shared in – no problems there.

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4. Kicked off the start menu to check what was there and here’s what is available to begin with – simple and minimalistic:

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5. Launched IE 10 – yes, IE 10. Since I haven’t done this on Windows 8, the first thing I did was point it to www.html5test.com. Why am I obsessed with this incomplete standard? No reason. Just cause. Still nowhere close to Chrome.

6. Changed the machine name to "DEV" and restarted for the changes to take effect.

7. Disabled the firewall for both private and public network – again very easy to do through the link on the server manager view.

8. Ever tried restarting Windows Server after Windows Update? That’s what I did next. 88 seconds to the login screen after restart. That is super fast compared to what I am used to. Very impressive!

Adding Roles

Next thing I wanted to do was add the Active Directory Domain Services role. Start by clicking on the "Add Roles and Features" link on the Server Manager dashboard

We start with the Before you begin screen which we always skip anyway. One thing to consider here is the assignment of a static IP to the machine. Especially since we intend to promote the machine to domain controller and that will require DNS setup. I have however deferred this to see if and how I’ll be prompted.

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Next, we have something new. You can choose to install roles on a physical machine or a VM.

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Next, since you are able to add multiple servers to the management dashboard, you are required to pick the server to add the role to:

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Back to Windows Server 2008 familiarity on the next screen – select the AD DS role and moved on

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Additional features required by AD DS are displayed

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Click on "Add Features" and moved on by hitting "Next" on the Server Roles screen. The Feature selection screen is displayed.

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Made no additional selections here and moved on. Here is where we get told that a DNS Server is required on the network and if one doesn’t exist, you will be prompted for the role on this machine which will obviously occur.

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Just one change on the confirmation page allowing you to select to restart the target server if necessary. Checked it and clicked "Install".

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After installation, something else that is different is there is a link available on the Results page to promote the machine to a domain controller. Nice! Not that it took me very long to “run dcpromo” but still a nifty little convenience. Clicked the link.

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The Configuration Wizard is launched and we are asked for a domain to join. Created a new forest:

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Some quick choices follow. Since it is going to be a standalone machine, I chose to keep the functional levels to Windows Server 2012. Since a DNS would be required, kept that checkbox checked. You don’t get a choice with GC which it will automatically be and since it is the only DC, it cannot be an RODC. Chose a restore password and moved on.

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On the next screen showed up a warning relating to how DNS delegation will not be possible without an authoritative parent zone. Hit "Next" and moved on.

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Chose a NETBIOS name on the next screen and went on.

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The next few screens are about selecting where the files go, review the options selected, getting the Powershell script if you are interested which I just hit "Next" through.

On the prerequisites screen is where we get warned about the DNS requiring a static IP address. Ignored all warnings and went on to hit "Install".

Installation went successfully and the machine restarted per choice made in earlier screen. After restart, back to the server manager – I like how it adds the new roles to the navigation on the left for quick configuration.

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At this point, we have Windows Server 2012 setup and configured and are ready to move on to the next step – that of installing SQL Server 2012. However, before we move on to that, there is the small matter of putting in place, the service accounts we’ll need to use for SQL Server and SharePoint.

Read about setting up the required service accounts in Part 2.

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